Worcester Regional Transit Authority

508-791-WRTA

About WRTA

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Our Mission

To provide convenient, comfortable, safe, reliable, cost-effective mobility services contributing to the economic vitality of the region.

To learn more about your community link to public transportation, please click here to download the WRTA presentation.

History

The Worcester Regional Transit Authority (WRTA) was created in September 1974, pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 161B of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The Authority is given general responsibility to develop, finance, and contract for the operation of mass transportation facilities and services within its territory.

The day-to-day affairs of the Authority are managed by the Administrator, Stephen F. O’Neil. This position is appointed by the Advisory Board. The Advisory Board consists of:

  • The City Manager of Worcester or Mayor of each city.
  • The Chairman of the Board of Selectmen of each town having such board, or the Town Manager or Town Administrator of each town.
  • Advisory Board members may appoint designees to act on their behalf.

How We Are Funded

The WRTA is a political subdivision of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts funded by federal, state and local monies, as well as farebox and advertising revenue. Our annual operating budget is $20 million, and up to 75% of the net cost of service is provided by the state. Fareboxes cover about 15-30% of the overall operating costs. The cities that are served by the WRTA buses pay an assessed amount, depending on the number of miles served in that city, and increases are capped at 2 1/2% per year. (Paratransit monies are assessed based on the number of trips provided.)

Federal funds must be used for what are called “capital projects”, which means the funds can only be spent on tangible items such as equipment, preventive maintenace of vehicles, facilities and equipment, ADA services, facility improvements, and purchasing vehicles. Operating expenses, such as salaries, benefits, advertising and marketing expenses, and other cash needs, must come from other sources of funding (grants, state and local funding, and farebox revenue.)


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